Walnut Canyon National Monument – Arizona

Walnut Canyon National Monument
Arizona

http://www.nps.gov/waca/imdex.htm

Completed: August 25, 2017

Senior Friendly

I actually completed this program in 2013 with my grandson, but misplaced the booklet and badge. I cherish the time I spent working on this with him, but wanted to have a replacement booklet and badge for this blog, so I worked on it while on my way to and from the Grand Canyon National Park this summer.

This park has ruins from 1300 CE when the Sinagua people inhabited the area. What makes these ruins unique is the ‘island’ of rock which the ruins are scattered along and many are accessible or at least easily seen from a one-mile trail which encircles the island. As this park sits at 7,000 feet and you have to walk down 185 vertical feet on stone stairs you need to carry water and be in good health. Not all of the ruins can be seen along the trail. The picture above shows some below the trail, these could be seen from a trail along the rim from the visitor center.

Three age groupings and their icon: Ages 7 and under – Horned Lizard, Ages 8 to 11 – Squirrel and Ages 12 and up – Raven. Each group is to complete the activities matching the icon showing on each page, with each group having three activities to complete.

Activities are; Trekking In and Out of the Canyon, Plant Hunter, Canyon Puzzler, A-MAZE-ing Trails, SENSE-ational Walnut Canyon, To Protect and Preserve, Park Rangers at Work, Where in the Canyon, Identify a Tree, Respect to Protect and Notes from the Edge. The last two activities are for all ages. The Raven activities are; Canyon Puzzler, To Protect and Preserve and Identify a Tree.

I always enjoy completing a crossword puzzle based on the park, much more than a word search. I always learn something from the clues. To Protect and Preserve was interesting, using a word bank, blanks are filled in to reconstruct the proclamation that established Walnut Canyon National Monument by President Woodrow Wilson in 1915. Wow, this site was established a year before the National Park Service was created from the Department of the Interior.

Identify a Tree is a great resource, besides helping me identify a Ponderosa Pine while visiting, it will help to identify other trees in the future. It uses a method of yes and no questions which create a key leading to six different trees found in this area, and throughout Arizona and the Southwest.

Ruin on rim

On the day I picked up the booklet a ceremony had just finished dedicating a plaque honoring Stephen Tyng Mather, considered the founder of the National Park Service. Not every site has a plaque, many were placed in the 1930s, again in the 1960s. The NPS Centennial in 2016 renewed interest in placing these plaques at more parks. Through private donations this plaque was installed on August 25, 2017. We missed the dedication, but enjoyed some cake. A few days later I returned with my booklet completed and received their beautiful wooden badge. This wooden badge is sturdier than other wooden badges I have received, probably not walnut, though.

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Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site – Arizona

Visitor Center

Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site
Arizona

http://www.nps.gov/hutr/index.htm

Completed: April 8, 2017

Senior Friendly

https://www.nps.gov/hutr/learn/kidsyouth/upload/Junior%20Ranger%20for%20Website-2.pdf

A visit to Hubbell Trading Post NHS is a step back in time, a time when this trading post would have been bustling with locals, brought by horse to trade their goods for supplies. This site has been active since 1878, and still serves the local Navajos as a place to buy goods , as well as trade or sell their crafts. You can walk into the trading post, buy some of the traditional items, such as blue cornmeal, hand-woven rugs and exquisite jewelry, as well as modern snacks and drinks. There are not a lot of buildings open to visit, without being on a tour, but the grounds are relaxing to stroll through.

The visitor center is along the road into the site and has some interesting displays. I picked up the booklet from the ranger on duty. The downloadable booklet linked above is a different booklet, it has more activities with better graphics. Both booklets only require completing four activities and neither give an upper, or lower age.

Stone Hogan

I completed all four activities; Visitor Center Facts, Matching Terms, Cross Number Puzzle and Navajo Rug. As simple as this booklet seemed to be, I have to say finding some of the answers was challenging. It caused me to read the displays very carefully. I really enjoyed the Cross Number Puzzle, using only numbers to fill in the grids was unique. Coloring the Navajo rug was fun.

It probably took about an hour to complete the booklet I received. Having to complete only four activities, also in the new booklet will probably just take an hour, as well. The ranger reviewed my answers, helped me with a few of the questions , then gave me a standard Junior Ranger badge.

Petrified Forest National Park – Arizona

Petrified Forest National Park
Arizona
http://www.nps.gov/pefo/imdex.htm

Completed: April 8, 2017

https://www.nps.gov/pefo/learn/kidsyouth/upload/JrRangerBook2017-ndd.pdf

Senior Friendly

You won’t just find beautiful petrified wood as you explore this park, you’ll also find unique buildings, remnants of Route 66, as well as dinosaur bones. Hopefully, you can drive the entire park, south to north, or reverse. Plan to stop and explore along the way, there are great views and short hikes to enjoy.

On a prior visit I had picked up a Junior Ranger booklet and worked on it before returning for this visit. Since picking up the booklet a new, with very nice and colorful graphics, booklet was issued. As I had completed the required number of activities listed in the new booklet I was awarded the Junior Ranger badge.

This program is Senior Friendly as no upper age limit is given. The age groupings and requirements are; 6 years or younger complete at least 3 activities, ages 7 to 10 complete at 5 activities and ages 11 or older complete at least 7 activities.

The twelve activities are; Experience Your America, Wildlife Watch, Archeology, Petrified Forest Crossword, Trail Explorer, Animal Adaptations, How Old Are These Things?, When We Left Home, No Bones About It, Petrified Wood Detective, Even More Spectacular, and Jr. Ranger Field Notes. I always appreciate when there are more activities than required for the upper age group, so I can pick and choose.

A unique feature of this program are the icons that can be found on park signs that match activities in the booklet. This is a big help as you travel and stop at the many interesting places, it alerts you to find a matching activity. I hope other parks add this feature to link their Junior Ranger activities to park signs.

As usual I enjoyed Wildlife Watch, as I find being alert for the local animals and their signs keeps it interesting while you are in a park. It makes you focus on what is out there, not just the activities in the booklet. On this trip I only saw Ravens and Lizards, I hope on a future visit to see Pronghorns. No Bones About It was a great activity while visiting the Rainbow Forest Museum, at the south end of the park, and use the information displayed to answer the questions.

Petrified wood is the reason to visit this park and Petrified Wood Detective allows you to get up and personal with a piece of wood and record what it feels like and the colors in the wood. Of course, while visiting the park it is OK to touch the wood, but not to remove it. As you enter and exit the park a ranger will talk to you about leaving all petrified wood in place. But, while out hiking in the park, spend time looking and touching the wide variety of textures and colors.

While driving the tour route I finished the booklet and stopped at the Painted Desert Inn, a beautiful building constructed with petrified wood in the early 1920s. The murals painted inside the rooms are gorgeous and well worth stopping to see. The ranger on duty reviewed my booklet, gave me a copy of the new booklet, had me recite the oath and awarded me their attractive enhance badge. The badge is shiny and depicts a landscape with a rising sun with petrified wood in the foreground. So much to see, get out and explore!

 

 

Navajo National Monument – Arizona

Betakin Ruin

Navajo National Monument
Arizona

http://www.nps.gov/nava/inde.htm

Completed: June 24, 2016

Senior Friendly

I love this park! I think the remoteness and lack of developed tourist services keep it special. Camping has been free during our many visits. The campground is near the visitor center and has a variety of campsites, the bathroom has running water with flush toilets. Water is available, but no hook ups. Oh, and the ruins associated with this park are wonderful, too. We’ve hiked to two of the three main ruins.

No age groupings are given, nor any minimum activities to complete. The program is basic and can be completed during a brief visit, if that is all the time you have. Activities are; Your Choice (Video, Hike or Ranger-led hike), Pottery for Every Day, Word Find, Leave no Trace, and Design Your Own Cliff Dwelling.

Spiderwort

I hiked the Sandal Trail, which is self-guiding and leaves from the back of the visitor center. This walks over slick rock and provides views of the Betakin Ruin. A daily ranger-led hike will take you down to the ruin. The Sandal Trail takes about a half hour and has interpretive signs along the way. Besides seeing paintbrush and penstemon blooming I heard the trill of a broad-tailed hummingbird.

Pottery for Every Day activity has you explore the museum for information about different types of pottery, then create your own design on a blank pot outline. The Word Search was more of a challenge than usual, many of the words were Native American, especially the Hopi words. A final activity allows you to Design Your Own Cliff Dwelling, I’m not sure I drew anything too creative.

Campground Sunset

The ranger on duty reviewed my booklet, issued the oath and gave me the standard Junior Ranger badge. This will not be my last visit to Navajo, I’ll be back to enjoy the flowers, sunsets and views!

 

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area – Arizona & Utah

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Hanging Gardens

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area
Arizona & Utah

http://www.nps.gov/glca/index.htm

Completed: May 17, 2016

Senior Friendly

Booklet: https://www.nps.gov/glca/learn/kidsyouth/upload/GLCA-Jr-Ranger-2013.pdf

Most of us know Glen Canyon National Recreation Area as Lake Powell, straddling Arizona and Utah. Over the years I have visited many the of sites within their 1.25 million acres, but this is the first time I worked on the Junior Ranger Program. It was a great way to understand the diversity of the park. Besides having lots of water, there are also locations which feature wildlife, history, paleontology and archaeology.

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Lees Ferry

This program is considered Senior Friendly as there is no upper age limit. Three ages groupings with a minimum number of activities for each range is provided. The groupings are; ages 6 to 8 complete 3 activities, ages 9 to 11 complete 5 activities and ages 12 and up complete 7 activities.

Glen Canyon NRA activities include; The Best Way to Care for the Land, From Fast Swimming to Fossilized, Crossing the Mighty Colorado – in the 1800s, Crossing the Mighty Colorado – Today, Who Needs Water, Take an Artistic Break, The Amaze-ing Colorado River Watershed, One Glen Canyon, Many Voices, Desert Dwellers, Power and the River, Ancient Ones if Glen Canyon, Experience Your America! and Junior Ranger Participation Log.

In the middle of the booklet is the Junior Ranger Participation Log, something I have not seen very often in booklet, but a good idea to keep track of the different activities completed. My log included camping at Hite where we say Great Blue Herons roosting on the cliff across the river. Another activity was hiking through the Lees Ferry Historic District. I sketched the old boiler I saw for Take an Artistic Break activity. This is a great place to see birds and lizards.

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Desert Spiny Lizard

One Glen Canyon, Many Voices has you match 9 pictures of people you could find within the recreation area; boaters, dam workers, Native Americans, ranchers and park rangers are a few examples. The 9 different Desert Dwellers, a bingo-style activity, presents different adaptations that plants and animals use to thrive in this environment. As you see something that matches that adaptation you are to draw that plant or animal. For Big Ears I saw a Black-tailed Jackrabbit and drew the ears, for Thermoregulation I saw several lizards and did a quick sketch of a lizard.

A number of the activities were simple enough that the the younger age groups will be able to easily complete their minimum requirement. Overall the booklet had a good diversity of activities to help you appreciate this very large park site. I took the completed booklet to the Carl Hayden Visitor Center at the Glen Canyon Dam to be reviewed. The day I was there the park staff was at training, so the tour staff for the dam gave me my Junior Ranger badge. No review or pledge, this time.

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Pipe Spring National Monument – Arizona

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Winsor Castle

Pipe Spring National Monument
Arizona

https://www.nps.gov/pisp/index.htm

Completed: June 2017

Senior Friendly

Download: https://www.nps.gov/pisp/learn/kidsyouth/upload/Junior-Ranger2016-web.docx

Almost in my backyard, at least in Arizona, but 475 miles northwest and in an entirely different ecosystem. The ecological diversity of Arizona is what I enjoy the most about living here. The distance might be a reason why this took so long for me to complete. I have visited this site numerous times over the years and always enjoy the wildlife seen while touring the grounds and Winsor Castle. The building was completed by Europeans settlers in the 1800s, but the land was home to the Kaibab Paiute tribe long before their arrival.

Note: I didn’t realize that I had previously completed this program and wrote a post last year. The 2016 Centennial Year was a busy year for me!

This program is Senior Friendly as no age groupings are provided and the staff just expect anyone to complete at least five activities during their visit This allows you to complete the booklet without attending the tour of Winsor Castle, in case your travel plans don’t match with tour times.

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Plateau Fence Lizard

Activities include; Pipe Spring Scavenger Hunt (bingo format), Explore the Museum, Animal Tracks, Outside Tour, 1873 Supplies, Fort Tour, Match Present to Past, and Learning Paiute!

The Scavenger Hunt has 12 pictures of items, plants or animals you can see while exploring the monument. Lizards, ravens, and cottontail rabbits are plentiful in this environment and easy to mark off while exploring. I enjoyed the Explore the Museum because besides finding answers in the displays there were questions after each section which relate to your own experience. This allows you to think about the information and apply it based on your own experience. The displays also provide a good overview of the history; from the early Native American period through Mormon habitation and to today’s Paiutes living here.

With some careful observation I was able to find lizard tracks in the dirt alongside the paced path behind the Visitor Center. Again the Outside Tour had you find information, but also asked questions for you to think about and answer. Visiting the pens of livestock, especially seeing the longhorn cattle was fun. The Fort Tour was led by a ranger and was excellent. Besides getting inside Winsor Castle, the items on display give you a good idea of what it would have been to live here in the 1850s when the Mormon’s used this to supply themselves and others of their faith. Thanks to the springs there was readily available water, but this harsh environment on the Arizona Strip would have made daily life difficult.

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Say’s Phoebe

Before the Europeans arrived in the 1800s the Kaibab Paiute tribe had lived here for centuries. I appreciated the page which had you try to learn Paiute words, eventually having you write your own phrase with the words provided. The monument is currently surrounded by Kaibab-Paiute tribal lands. The nearby campground is administered by the tribe.

Once I completed the booklet I was sworn in by the staff at the entrance desk and given their enhanced Junior Ranger Badge which features the Winsor Castle.

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Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument – Arizona

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Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument
Arizona

http://www.nps.gov/index/sucr

Senior Friendly

Completed: August 1, 2014

Online:
https://www.nps.gov/sucr/planyourvisit/upload/SUCR%20JR%20Workbook3.pdf

As a national monument, almost in my background, this is a site I have visited numerous times over the years. A very favorite campground, Bonito, is across the road from the visitor center. I have actually completed this Junior Ranger program twice, March 2013 and August 2014. The first time I completed with my two grandchildren and then on my own. And as I have stated before I learned and experienced something new.

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This program is considered Senior Friendly as no age groupings are given, just the direction to complete five or more pages. There are six pages in the booklet. A nice feature of this program is you may turn in your completed packet at either the Sunset Crater Volcano or Wupatki visitor centers. There is a beautiful drive between the two sites which allows you to continue on your trip without returning to the visitor center.

The activities are; Monitoring Our Living Earth, The Great Earth Puzzle, A Place of Cultural Importance, Legend Has It, Excellent Eruptions, Lookin’ at the Lava, Making a Difference, A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words and Sunset Search.

The answers for the first several activities are found in the visitor center displays. A monitor shows current earthquake activity, on my two visits I located recent earthquakes in Alaska, California, and the Tonga Islands.

While walking along the Lava Flow Trail through the Bonito Lava Flow I was able to locate five of the seven features; Sunset Crater Volcano, San Francisco Mountain, Aa lava, Xenolith and a Squeeze-up.

One of my favorite activities when completing Junior Ranger programs is interviewing a park ranger. Ranger Robert told me he had a degree in Field Biology and his favorite place in the park is the O’Leary Trail because it provides a nice overview of the park. On my second visit in March 2014 I combined the last two activities into one by drawing Sunset Search finds.
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Pipe Spring National Monument – Arizona

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Pipe Spring National Monument
Arizona

http://www.nps.gov/pisp/index.htm

Completed: May 18, 2016

Senior Friendly

Download: https://www.nps.gov/pisp/learn/kidsyouth/upload/Junior-Ranger2016-web.docx

Pipe Spring National Monument is in the Arizona Strip, a northern section of the state that looks dry; this site is an oasis. The building, Winsor Castle, was built by early ranchers on land that the Paiute Indians called home for at least 1000 years. The visitor center and living history displays on the grounds tells the whole story from ancient times to the late 1800s. It is a great place to explore.

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This program gets the Senior Friendly rating as no age limits is given. I printed the booklet before I left home and was able to complete several of the activities before I arrived. Once there I spent additional time in the visitor center and attended a ranger program to complete this program. There is no requirement to attend a ranger program, however the information I learned helped me in completing the booklet.

The activities include; Pipe Spring Scavenger Hunt, Explore the Museum, Animal Tracks at Pipe Spring National Monument, Pipe Spring Outside, Wagonload Supplies, Fort Tour, Match Past to Present, and Paiute Language.

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All of the activities gave me a better understanding of the history of this site, and of the natural environment of this area, including changes in water resources. The tour of the house with the period contents gives you a good idea what life was like in the 1800s.

Once I completed all of the activities my booklet was reviewed by staff at the front desk. I appreciated their review and discussion we had to clarify some of my answers. After reciting the Junior Ranger Pledge and stamping my booklet with their passport and NPS Centennial stamp I received an enhanced badge. The badge depicts an outline of Winsor Castle.

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Arizona Trail National Scenic Trail – BLM

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North Kaiba Trail – Grand Canyon National Park
http://www.aztrail.org/juniorexplorer

Completed: January 19, 2016

Senior Friendly

The Arizona Trail almost runs through my backyard in Tucson, about 10 miles to the east. I have hiked short sections throughout Arizona; the whole trail is over 800 miles and reaches from Mexico to Utah. Hikers, bicyclists and horseback riders are able to cover the entire distance either as a through-trip (taking a long time) or done in sections.
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The trail passes through private and public land; public lands managed by state and federal agencies. Some of the federal agencies are; Bureau of Land Management, US Forest Service, and Department of Interior. An important resource to enjoy the trail is the Arizona Trail Organization which can be reached at http://www.aztrail.org.

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This program has a a very attractive handbook with excellent graphics and detailed information about what you would see along the 800 mile route. I was fortunate to find this booklet at the REI store in Tucson, however the entire handbook can be completed online. The BLM (Bureau of Land Management) provided this Junior Explorer program. It is considered Senior Friendly as no age range is given. With the information provided in the reading the material in this booklet is advanced. With adult help younger children could answer the questions and earn the patch.
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Another unique part of this program is your answers are submitted online. Once you complete the handbook and submit the answers an attractive patch is mailed to you. I was surprised when my patch arrived within a week. I celebrated by hiking a 3-1/2 mile section, Marsh Station Road to Colossal Cave Mountain Park.
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But before I earned my patch I had to complete the booklet. The trail for this activity begins at the southern border, the border with Mexico and works north. The page titles are; Arizona-Sonora Borderlands, Following Water: from top to bottom, The Sky Islands, Biotic Communities: along the Arizona Trail, The Gila River, Tracking Felines: on the Arizona Trail, Mogollon Rim, Cream-Filled Cookie:Plate Tectonics, San Francisco Peaks, Anatomy: of a Volcano, The Grand Canyon, Build Your Own Trail:along the Arizona Trail, The Arizona Strip, Create A Sound Map:along the Arizona Trail, Share The Trail: with other trail users!, and More Places: to Play and Learn.

Not all of your answers will be submitted online, some drawing activities are included, as well as a demonstration of Plate Tectonics which you can eat after you are done! There are a couple of charts to complete and time spent listening outside to create a sound map. Only the online answers count towards earning the patch. I found answering all of the required questions nefoe I went online worked much better than The great part about this program is you can complete anywhere, without ever setting foot along the trail. I think if you did do this program without experiencing the trail itself, you would make it a priority to visit Arizona and enjoy some portion of the trail in the future.
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A Junior Explorer Oath on the back of the handbook provides a certificate for you to complete. And as mentioned before, your attractive patch will arrive shortly just by submitting your answers online.
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Tuzigoot National Monument – Arizona

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Tuzigoot National Monument
Arizona

http://www.nos.gov/tuzi

Completed: October 8, 2015

Online: http://www.nps.gov/tuzi/learn/kids

Senior Friendly

A small, but interesting site in Central Arizona highlighting ruins from almost 1,000 years ago. As part of the Verde Valley you cross the Verde River, year-round flow, as you approach this area. The surrounding views are spectacular.

This Junior Ranger Activity Guide is considered Senior Friendly as there are three age groups; turtle symbol for 6-7 years old, sycamore leaf symbol for 8-9 years old, and macaw symbol for 10 years or older.

The activities include; Excavating Your Life, Museum Scavenger Hunt, How many pots can you find?, Then and Now, Searching for Clues, Prehistoric Style, Understanding the Clues, Pueblo Trail, A View from on Top, Tavasci Marsh Trail, Poetry Corner and Share with a Park Ranger…

I had picked up the booklet on a previous visit and was intrigued by the page titled “How many pots can you find?”. The visitor center contains museum-style cabinets full of pots. Counting them took concentration, as I would notice another one hiding under a shelf after moving on. My final count was 52, a number the staff told me was one of several numbers considered an acceptable answer. The discrepancies could be related to what is a pot? Once the count was complete you draw your favorite pot, mine was a corrugated jar, the coils had not been smoothed over creating a nice texture.

Understanding the Clues allows you to study a real archeology report, on the previous page, then use clues to determine the answers. It was helpful to see the diversity of the pottery styles and to appreciate how the differences help you determine the age of a piece of pottery. It reminded me of Antiques Roadshow when they look at an item and can tell the owner when it was made.

Ruins
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Walking the Pueblo Trail, a hilltop covered in ruins, was beautiful on this October day. Besides enjoying the ruins the surrounding views are stunning. Tuzigoot is set in the Verde Valley, near the Verde River, hilltop mining town of Jerome and within view of the red rocks of Sedona. Sections of ruins were built over time, some as long as 900 years ago.

Staff
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After walking through the museum and then the ruins I was able to complete the activity guide. After a staff member reviewed the booklet I received the badge. I purchased the patch from the bookstore. The inside back cover of the activity guide contains the Certificate of Achievement.

Booklet, badge, certificate and patch
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